Alt image
Stacks Image 34719
Alt image
Stacks Image 34721
Alt image
Stacks Image 34723
Alt image
Stacks Image 34725
Alt image
Stacks Image 34727
CD ripping, digital music, music streaming, iPod / iTunes / Sonos - various thoughts, suggestions, ideas, odd ramblings ….

iTunes Music Store?

In the world of Apple there are rumours, "fake news" and all sorts of fanciful speculation. It's been that way ever since I've been using Apple computers so I hesitate before I respond. Remember, I'm the person confidently forecasting a super-giant iPod Classic running on solid state memory and that's no more likely today than when I first suggested it a decade ago.

So I've hesitated before saying this. Deep breath, here goes - Apple will shutter iTunes Music Store by the end of this year.

That will be it. No more 79p tracks and £7-99 albums. No more chance of U2 suddenly being foist upon you. The buy button will be no more.

What does this mean? Well, anything you've bought will continue to be playable. At the moment if you suffer a data corruption you can re-download purchases from Apple. I've not seen any suggestion on how that could be handled. My suspicion is that if you corrupt your local copy, that will be it.

For a while there have been two levels of cloud service. One, where your music is loaded to their cloud and you can access that either on the go or from a remote location. My guess is that will end. The second is access to the iTunes catalogue as a streaming music service similar to Spotify. My expectation is that will continue with the first type of account being encouraged to upgrade / spend more to get unlimited access.

The impact on you? Mostly I don't think people will notice. The first cloud option wasn't massively popular and was a trifle user-hostile. Younger consumers have been educated to expect all-you-can-eat music streaming services. You can access these on the ubiquitous iPhone so they'll sail on quite happily.

If you used Apple to "buy" music then indeed you'll be hit, but very few people I've come across do that any longer. Should you want to purchase music in future there's always Amazon who might benefit from a sales boost.

Personally it helps us, people who love music have found streaming services are often limited. Should you have an affection for classical music, rock music and folk do you really want to have to sign up for three streaming services? And hop from one app to another to assemble an evening's worth of music? Don't forget too, three monthly fees.

I believe the big losers will be second tier artists. Compared with Spotify and the like they got a higher payout per track or album. Take YouTube, their payments make your eyes water by comparison to iTunes. Sure the big guys will continue to do well, the small fry have never made money under any model, but for the also rans the pressure to perform will increase.

iTunes Music Store?

In the world of Apple there are rumours, "fake news" and all sorts of fanciful speculation. It's been that way ever since I've been using Apple computers so I hesitate before I respond. Remember, I'm the person confidently forecasting a super-giant iPod Classic running on solid state memory and that's no more likely today than when I first suggested it a decade ago.

So I've hesitated before saying this. Deep breath, here goes - Apple will shutter iTunes Music Store by the end of this year.

That will be it. No more 79p tracks and £7-99 albums. No more chance of U2 suddenly being foist upon you. The buy button will be no more.

What does this mean? Well, anything you've bought will continue to be playable. At the moment if you suffer a data corruption you can re-download purchases from Apple. I've not seen any suggestion on how that could be handled. My suspicion is that if you corrupt your local copy, that will be it.

For a while there have been two levels of cloud service. One, where your music is loaded to their cloud and you can access that either on the go or from a remote location. My guess is that will end. The second is access to the iTunes catalogue as a streaming music service similar to Spotify. My expectation is that will continue with the first type of account being encouraged to upgrade / spend more to get unlimited access.

The impact on you? Mostly I don't think people will notice. The first cloud option wasn't massively popular and was a trifle user-hostile. Younger consumers have been educated to expect all-you-can-eat music streaming services. You can access these on the ubiquitous iPhone so they'll sail on quite happily.

If you used Apple to "buy" music then indeed you'll be hit, but very few people I've come across do that any longer. Should you want to purchase music in future there's always Amazon who might benefit from a sales boost.

Personally it helps us, people who love music have found streaming services are often limited. Should you have an affection for classical music, rock music and folk do you really want to have to sign up for three streaming services? And hop from one app to another to assemble an evening's worth of music? Don't forget too, three monthly fees.

I believe the big losers will be second tier artists. Compared with Spotify and the like they got a higher payout per track or album. Take YouTube, their payments make your eyes water by comparison to iTunes. Sure the big guys will continue to do well, the small fry have never made money under any model, but for the also rans the pressure to perform will increase.

Collecting CDs in Person

Yes, we collect in person. We've been doing this for coming up to sixteen years. The miles covered, the jams endured, the hours in service stations and my series of clubs (McDonalds). I think I've visited each one in London.

But it's coming to an end, this year.

After December the personal collection / return option will be no more. Simply had enough of it, sorry TfL, I'm sure you're doing your best but traffic moves far slower today than it did when we started. The standard of driving is much lower. I never thought I'd have to invest in a dash cam to record the unbelievable stupidity of some drivers, cyclists and pedestrians.

The message is clear, if you want or need personal collection you need to act now. Come December (not sure exactly when in that month) the option will be withdrawn. Until then happy to endure the roads.

After December we'll be mail based. Further details later but when we began thinking about this the possibility of losing clients was a brake on this decision. However for many years we've offered a mail based service and we've also been explaining to anyone who rings that they can mail their discs to us. Whilst many clients love the high service option of collection many are happy to mail or deliver their CDs in person.

This last week we've received over 2,000 CDs either by mail or by personal delivery, so this option works well for many people. We hope it will work well for you too ... but if not, act now while the personal collection option is still on offer.

iPods - impending doom, act now.

Yesterday Apple killed two of their iPod models - the iPod Nano and the iPod Shuffle. Cue some tears.

Mixed feelings here. I could see the point go the Nano and I know it was popular with our clients. Maybe not for "mainstream" high quality music listening but for younger family members, as a gift, as a commute system, for a second home of to leave in the car. Great device.

Shuffle? Never really got it. I know people who got them as a jogging companion or for very small children. No screen, ultra tiny capacity, dull exterior, hit and miss playing experience. Sorry, not one for me and I won't mourn its passing.

Still, if these devices are your thing you might find some left in-stock with retailers if you act really fast. Apple's online store now only offers the iPod touch (which I think is great). Argos are showing both the Nano and the Touch, Amazon are listing Nano, Touch and Classic as available.

Looking to the future the tide is rising and the next inline is clearly supplies of the Classic. With large portable playing capacity and better Digital to Analogue conversion now may be the best if not last time for you to buy.

iPod to PC / Mac Music Recovery

Even this late in the iPod lifecycle we're getting a couple of calls a week in the same vein. "Can you get music off my iPod and onto my computer?"

There are still people who, for whatever reason, have music on an iPod that isn't on their current computer. Often it's due to that hard drive failing, sometimes people move to a new PC and forget to take their iTunes library with them. They're left with an iPod Classic stuffed with tracks and a new PC / Mac with no music. Can we get their music back?

Let's be clear what isn't a problem - purchased music. If you log into your iTunes account on the new computer you can re-download tracks you purchased from iTunes Music Store. The issue lies with the music you've ripped from your purchased CDs. Can those tracks be recovered?

As we often say to clients - all things are possible. If you do a Google search you'll find several pages with guaranteed, surefire, undoubted methods to backup from an iPod to a computer. Indeed, in the early days of our CD ripping service, we did this pretty often. We even purchased software for our Macs and PCs that allowed us to do this. At the heart of any of these approaches is an intervention to stop the automatic sync of device and computer. Once that has even begun, in that fraction of a second, if you can't grab the music player an turn it into a vanilla flavoured external storage device, you're screwed. You don't get two chances. Zap, it's all gone.

Today it's much more difficult than it was fifteen years ago. The whole process is so much faster. Of course we have our own iPods to practice with and we speak from experience. We know that it goes wrong too often. Of course we're speaking from a commercial perspective, we're no longer confident that we can take on the risk of it not working. So we're happy if you want to say it can be done, it's just we're not doing it any more.

Show more posts

Login

© Jeff Underwood 2011–2015 Contact